NEXT ART CONTESTS STARTS IN

JANUARY 2018

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TUNE
INTO THE
ART WORLD

THIS MONTHS FEATURED ARTIST

FRANK FRAZETTA

By the 1980s Frank Frazetta's fame was all encompassing. He was essentially the fantasy artist that everyone wanted. Clint Eastwood, George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and Sylvester Stallone all commissioned works for their various movie projects. Princess Leia Organa's "metal bikini" costume in "Return of the Jedi" was inspired by Frazetta's artwork according to costume designer Aggie Guerard Rodgers

 

Other people knocking on Frazetta's door included Francis Ford Copolla, Marlon Brando, Sandra Loche, Dino De Laurentiis, Tom Laughlin, Patrick Duffy, Charleton Heston, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Orson Welles, Cher, Dick Clark and John & Bo Derek (Frazetta did their corporate logo for their corporate logo "Svengali").

In 1983 Frank Frazetta was given creative control for the animated movie "Fire and Ice" (produced by Ralph Bakshi). Most of the characters and the plot was Frazetta's doing, but the movie was a commercial disappointment as the animation technology at the time was raw at best and the public was more interested in Star Wars at the time.

Frazetta's artwork also graced the covers of record albums. Molly Hatchet's first two albums feature "The Death Dealer" and "Dark Kingdom" respectively. Dust's album "Hard Attack" features the painting "Snow Giants", rock group Nazareth used "The Brain" for their 1977 album "Expect No Mercy" and Frazetta created new artwork that appeared on "Buddy Bought The Farm" by horror band "The Dead Elvi". More recently the band Wolfmother used "The Sea Witch" as the cover for their self-titled debut album used other Frazetta paintings for the covers of their singles and for some of their merchandise. In the late 1980s he was commissioned to paint the cover to "Battlefield Earth", written by L. Ron Hubbard.

INSPIRATIONAL ART INTERVIEWS
 

There are many misconceptions about the art world. Ask someone to describe what it means to be an artist, and they will probably paint a picture of one of two extremes. There is no perceived middle ground, no stability, no security: there are simply those who make it, and those who don't.

The quintessential artist-failure is dedicated, talented, yet tragically unappreciated. Regrettably, their work acquires value only after their death.

The other extreme is the artist-celebrity. The conceptualists, the YBAs, the Damien Hirsts – these cunning characters are able to sell anything, particularly if it has some kind of biological waste product artfully smeared across it.

If popular opinion is anything to go by, the creative sector is a huge gamble, braved only by reckless, or masochistic, individuals. But if you're an art student, you need to know if this "make or break" view bears any relation to reality.

I've completed three years at art school, and am now an MA student, and as far as I can see – no, it doesn't. But with all the stereotyping that goes on, it's tough for students to work out what to expect from a career in the arts. So let's try to make things a little clearer – and maybe dispel some myths along the way.

 

Here are 10 honest truths about work, life and leisure in the creative industry.

ONLINE ARTIST MARKETS

Meet 117,118 contemporary artists, buy directly from them. 

Discover new works by emerging artists from around the world.

Detroit Artists Market shows and sells works by many of the region’s most talented artists. 

FEATURED ART DOCUMENTARY

THE DEEPEST DEPTHS OF THE BURROW

Nychos is an illustrator, Urban Art- and Graffiti artist who became known with his street concept RABBIT EYE MOVEMENT (REM) 10 years ago. The icon of the movement is a white rabbit, which has been breeding since then and has been popping up in the streets all over the globe for the past decade.

 

This is exactly what Nychos thrives for – he travels the world to spread his art and his REM concept. Within the last two years Nychos was accompanied by filmmaker Christian Fischer who recorded these journeys to create a full lenght movie. ”The Deepest Depths Of The Burrow” is a documentary about art, lifestyle and subculture. The movie captures the experiences of Nychos and other members of RABBIT EYE MOVEMENT within the last several years. 

Wassily Kandinsky: 1866-1944 a Revol

Wassily Kandinsky: 1866-1944 a Revol

By Hajo Düchting The founder of abstract art The Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky (1866-1944), who later lived in Germany and France, is one of the pioneers of twentieth-century art. Nowadays he is regarded as the founder of abstract art and is, moreover, the chief theoretician of this type of painting.

Mondrian (Basic Art)

Mondrian (Basic Art)

By Susanne Deicher, Piet Taschen Less is often more - such is Piet Mondrian's approach to art. His main pictorial elements are horizontals and verticals, his preferred colours yellow, red and blue.

Symbolism

Symbolism

By Michael Gibson Part of the "Big Art" series of illustrated texts, this one covers Symbolism.

Henri Matisse (Big Art)

Henri Matisse (Big Art)

By Gilles Néret Matisse, the bard of colour, and Picasso, the breaker of moulds: together, these two giants shaped the world of modern art. They were, as Picasso once said, "North Pole, South Pole."

Picasso

Picasso

By Carsten-Peter Warncke, Ingo F. Walther "The definitive introduction to the scope and range of Picasso's work." The Times, London

Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali

By Robert Descharnes, Gilles Néret

Georgia O'Keeffe, 1887-1986: Flowers

Georgia O'Keeffe, 1887-1986: Flowers

The art of American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) is splendid with colour and laden with hidden sensuality. O'Keeffe's name rests mainly on the large-format flower pictures that have assured her an unusual place in the annals of art, between realist and abstract.

Expressionism: A Revolution in Germa

Expressionism: A Revolution in Germa

By Dietmar Elger In six chapters -- The Brucke Group of Artists, Northern German Expressionism, The Blaue Reiter, Rhenish Expressionism, The City and Expressionism in Vienna -- this publication deals with a specifically German artistic revolution, a phenomenon that has quite accurately been described as "the most significant German contribution to 20th century European art.

How Art Made the World

How Art Made the World

In the late nineteenth century, the first discoveries of prehistoric painting were greeted with incredulity. How could there have been such deft and skillful artists in the world over 30,000 years ago? Noted art historian Nigel Spivey begins with this puzzle to explore the record of humanity’s artistic endeavors and their impact on our own development.

The Power of Art

The Power of Art

"Great art has dreadful manners," Simon Schama observes wryly at the start of his epic and explosive exploration of the power, and whole point, of art.

Art Through The Ages

Art Through The Ages

By Helen Gardner, Fred S. Kleiner, Christin J. Mamiya The market-leading text for the art history survey course, GARDNER'S ART THROUGH THE AGES has served as a comprehensive and thoughtfully crafted guide to the defining phases of the world's artistic tradition.

The Letters of Vincent van Gogh

The Letters of Vincent van Gogh

A new selection of post-impressionist painter Vincent Van Gough's letters, The Letters of Vincent van Gogh put a human face on one of the most haunting figures in modern Western culture. In this Penguin Classics edition, the letters are selected and edited by Ronald de Leeuw, and translated by Arnold Pomerans in Penguin Classics.

ART LITERATURE

ONLINE ART MAGAZINES

THIS MONTHS FEATURED MUSEUM

The National Gallery London

The National Gallery, situated at the Trafalgar Square, London, attracts approximately 4 to 5 million visitors yearly. It was founded in 1824 and has since become home for London’s splendid collection of roughly 2,300 paintings, which date back from the middle of 13th century to the 19th century. Distinct from Museo del Prado of Madrid and Louvre of Paris, National Gallery was not designed to take over a subsisting royal collection. It started when the British government during that time bought around 36 paintings from John Julius Angerstein. Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, who was one of its primary directors during the olden times, arranged the artworks together with other privately donated pieces. As opposed to other national galleries in Europe, National Gallery’s collection is rather small in number, but most of it are the important works from noted painters like Giotto down to Cézanne.

A visit to this noteworthy destination is free of charge. Meaning you don’t have to spend money to see the famous works of Da Vinci, Van Gogh, Titian, Michelangelo, Botticelli, Raphael, Rembrandt, Monet, Seurat, Caravaggio, Nicolas Poussin, Hans Holbein the Younger, Anthony Van Dyck, Johannes Vermeer, George Stubbs and many other great artists. Popular paintings here include “ The Baptism of Christ,” “The Virgin of the Rocks,” “The Madonna of the Pinks,” “Van Gogh’s Chair,” and “The Rokeby Venus” among others.

HIDDEN GALAXIES

NEXT COMPETITION ENDS: JAN 26th. 

ART COMPETITIONS
OIL PAINTERS OF AMERICA
bocs
london creative competition
INternational competition
emerging artists
Red 2017
imaginarium
Chelsea International Photography Competition
monthly masters
characterized
splash 20
las laguna
aia
cafe
apm
imprint
midwest
cds

ART

HAUT

HOUS

INSTRUCTIONAL

Sharpening And Learning New Skills Is Vital For Success

The secret to success in any venture is to never stop learning. Whether a person has earned an advanced degree or is just beginning a new career, it’s always a good idea to continuously be learning new skills.

It’s especially important to sharpen and learn skills that are capable of being transferred from one type of career to another. This ensures that a person will always be marketable in an increasingly competitive working environment. If you are currently considering going back to school to learn some new skills, the following information will help you get started on making a decision that will benefit your career:

CARTOON ARCHIVE

FEATURED CARTOONIST

DAVID HORSEY

David Horsey, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist and columnist, is a political commentator for the Los Angeles Times. His work is syndicated by Tribune Media Services to more than 200 newspapers, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, the Houston Chronicle and the Boston Globe.

Besides winning two Pulitzers for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer in 1999 and 2003, Horsey has received the National Press Foundation’s Berryman Award for Cartoonist of the Year and many other honors, including first place in the Best of the West Journalism Competition for his columns about the 2008 presidential election.

After graduating from the University of Washington, Horsey entered journalism as a political reporter. His multi-faceted career has taken him to national political party conventions, presidential primaries, the Olympic Games, the Super Bowl, assignments in Europe, Japan and Mexico and two extended stints working at the Hearst Newspapers Washington Bureau.

 

As a Rotary Foundation Scholar, Horsey earned an MA in International Relations from the University of Kent at Canterbury. He was also awarded an honorary doctorate from Seattle University.

Horsey has published eight books of cartoons, including his two most recent, Draw Quick, Shoot Straight and Refuge of Scoundrels

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ART EDUCATION